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Low inventory sparks part-time debate

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Real Estate Professional | 25 Sep 2014, 10:15 AM Agree 1
Increasingly frustrated full-time agents are calling on industry associations to better police the activities of so-called “part-timers” as analysts project continuing declines in listings for key markets based on new stats.
  • Frank | 25 Sep 2014, 10:57 AM Agree 1
    As long as part-timers can provide a great service to their clients, who cares if they have another job. We pay the same dues as full-timers.
  • Marlon | 25 Sep 2014, 12:51 PM Agree 2
    It's not about the dues we pay, it's about the standard of service we as professional realtors provide to our clients. This business is no different than any other job, where you get better as you gain more on the job experience, continuous education and daily training. If an agent spends 40 hours at another job and focuses his/her energies there, you have to question the level of knowledge and experience he/her is really providing to his/her client through the Real Estate transaction. I believe the lack of commitment to this profession by some of it's members, is also bringing the level professionalism down throughout our profession, where part-time agents are providing clients part-time services and substandard results, leading the public to question the value of hiring an Realtor.
  • | 25 Sep 2014, 01:06 PM Agree 0
    The training mentioned above is more for converting leads to Clients....in essence accumulate business which Ofcourse is useful. The training is more about customer acquisition.
    I agree part timers hurt bread and butter of full timers but not necessarily customer satisfaction.
  • Larry | 25 Sep 2014, 01:09 PM Agree 2
    Would you see the advice of a part-time financial planner or take your family to a part-time dentist? Most part-time agents can't attend training cause they are working during the day. They can't negotiate so they want offers faxed, how is that performing the best for your clients. I know there will always be seller that don't want to pay full commission, until they are sued. The largest investment next to your health should not be dealt with lightly.
  • George | 25 Sep 2014, 01:41 PM Agree 3
    From the point of you of the service, of course I agree. If they are part timers, they have just free few hours per week and that's not enough to get experience, hence... awful service offered to their clients. But if OREA, RECO and CREA do nothing about it, it's because they get more money from them. Do you think that they REALLY care about the kind of service that those agents provide to their clients? They just look at the MONEY they can collect. The more members registered, the more money they get.
    Think about it: Only TREB has about 40,000 members where about only HALF of them make just 2 or 3 deals p/year. ONLY about 20% of the members make 6 or more deals p/year. Toronto and GTA do not need 40,000 Realtors but TREB, OREA & CREA do need them.
    If that's not enough, think about the new style for courses of "continuing education": OREA forces to pay $44 p/agent p/year (even when they know that 90% of every course is pure useless crap). I don't know the right number but lets assume that Ontario has about 80,000 Realtors. That means $3.5 Millions in "education".
    It's simple: More Agents = More money. Do you think that they are going to create any restriction for part time agents ? If more of them want to get into this industry, they will receive them with open arms ! As Liza Minelli sang in Cabaret: "Money, money, money, money, money..."
  • Andrew | 25 Sep 2014, 01:48 PM Agree 2
    Part time agent go back to your day job and leave the Real Estate business to full time agents
  • | 25 Sep 2014, 01:56 PM Agree 1
    AGREED - BUT - Don't just mention the part times agents. What about all these 0% companies coming out of the wood work - lets get them out of the business as well. You think that isn't hurting your business because it sure is. And the people trying to sell their own houses. It is unbelievable that they have permission to advertise on the same webs as us. Brutal
  • | 25 Sep 2014, 01:58 PM Agree 0
    Excellent point from George. What are the five things that a client would receive from a guilty time agent but not a part timer. Let's assume the client is OK viewing properties in the evenings...
  • | 25 Sep 2014, 02:11 PM Agree 1
    Can someone just giving part time attention to a job know it as well as someone who does it day in and day out? It's about visiting houses, knowing the neighborhood inside out and having that up to the minute knowledge and experience from living and breathing all day every day. I believe there should almost be a different designation for each - maybe 'hobby agent...' :-)
  • GARO | 25 Sep 2014, 02:22 PM Agree 1
    I HAVE BEEN A BROKER FOR 37 YEARS , AND FOR MANY YEARS WE WERE NOT ALLOWED TO HAVE ANOTHER JOB BUT NOW FOR THE GREED OF THE REALSTATE BOARDS TO COLECT MORE DUES ARE TURNING A BLIND EYE FOR EVRYTHING I JUST SOLD A PROPERTY THE BROKER ASKED ME IF I COULD TAKE HIM THE ACCEPTED OFFER AND GAVE ME THE ADRESS OF WHERE HE WASE HE OWNED A CLOTHING STORE AND WAS VERY HAPPY WITH A 1 OR 2 SALES A YEAR ON THE SIDE. THIS HAS TO BE REMEDIDE RIGHT AWAY.
  • | 25 Sep 2014, 02:28 PM Agree 1
    Time of of the essence contractually speaking. If we cannot get response from agents for showings, offers or counter-offers, the service is not there. The complications and ramifications to the clients when offers can quickly become multiple, does not serve the buyer. What does not serve the seller is the lack of focus. As a client, I would want it disclosed if the agent is not totally invested career wise. How does the client know that the agent is not committed to his profession if it is not disclosed?
  • Mark Granada KW | 25 Sep 2014, 02:41 PM Agree 2
    I am a full time agent and I strongly believe the typical real estate client would NOT hire a part-time agent period. I have nothing against part-time agents making an honest living but I don't believe most consumers even know they are not full-time agents. I think that a simple solution for everyone involved is to let the truth be known. This can be done by obliging the part-time agents to 'declare' they are part time in any brokerage contract to list or purchase.... and to declare as well how many hours weekly they are committed to another job and what that job is. Adversely, any full-time agent that becomes part-time by working at another job, must also declare it. It wouldn't be fair in a free-enterprise society to stop part-timers completely from practicing as a realtor (I think we all started part-time at some point). But at least the laws should protect the consumer by giving them the knowledge of who and who isn't a part-timer and the choice of hiring them or not.
  • | 25 Sep 2014, 03:20 PM Agree 1
    Game on Mark Granada..... Love that attitude ..... That included full time realtors who are mortgage brokers or have another business like training , coaching .... etc
  • Doron Grill | 25 Sep 2014, 03:20 PM Agree 0
    There are bad servers, doctors, plumbers, dentists. Guess what, there are bad Realtors, both full time and part time. You want a law stopping part time Realtors from making a living? Good luck with that idiotic idea.
  • David S | 25 Sep 2014, 03:32 PM Agree 0
    Would you hire a part time surgeon to operate on one of your children? If this is Part Time, obviously your first priority is to your full time job.
  • Albiana | 25 Sep 2014, 04:04 PM Agree 2
    In Manitoba we are not allowed to work as part time agents. We are in the service industry and when you are dealing with peoples largest assents you should be able to provide them with 100% of your time and focus. I think that Ontario is overcrowded with too many Realtors due to the fact that they are allowed to work part time in the industry. I feel like the part time realtors are not giving their 100% and in turn are giving Realtors a bad name in the industry.
  • | 25 Sep 2014, 04:42 PM Agree 0
    I have never heard of part time surgeon and thats the nature of surgery, I have heard of part time realtors, part time financial advisors, ...part time IT professionals as the respective jobs has shown possibilities of part time existence. What are the 5 things a full time realtor provides that a part time realtor cant ? lets assume that the client is comfortable with after 5 pm service
  • Gord | 25 Sep 2014, 06:15 PM Agree 1
    There is nothing to say that someone can't be a part time agent. The lack falls in the initial training set up of the regulatory body. There are years of study and exams to be a noted professional and to be a great agent requires all of that.

    The initial courses that one has to do to be an agent is just short of a joke. I have seen it time and time again where you wind up doing the work for a part timer because they don't know how to prepare an offer, write a listing and display correct information. The regulatory body should consider the profession as just that. A profession whereby there should be basic sales courses and potentially a mentorship program available ( at a cost of course ). This way agents will be trained in "being an agent" and not just in the legal aspects of staying out of court.

    One of the main reasons that the public views the profession the way they do because you have these agents that are part time and/or who don't really take it seriously and that's an issue when dealing with the sale and purchase of someone's largest asset. So in a way, the regulatory body should examine what's deemed mandatory for training and perhaps have a more in-depth and lengthy training and qualification process if they are concerned about consumer protection.
  • | 25 Sep 2014, 06:17 PM Agree 0
    Just a surprise to a few...there are quite a few, almost inclined to say many, part time physicians working in Ontario. And some do hospital work and some do surgery/assist surgery in the hospital.
    Anyone that is in the business of providing a service and fails to render that service ought not to be in that business.
    Anyone that is in the business of providing a service and excels at rendering that service, ought to do very well and be noticed by others.
  • Nick Boothby | 25 Sep 2014, 11:09 PM Agree 1
    I'm pretty sure that when applying to renew your RECO registration, you are obliged to show whether you work full-time or part-time in Real Estate.
    Also I believe that, if your full-time or part-time status changes during the next two years before again renewing your RECO registration, then you are obliged to inform RECO immediately, just the same as you are obliged to inform RECO whenever you change your Brokerage affiliation or your home address.
    IF I'm correct about having to inform RECO of your full-time or part-time status, then WHY is this information not made available to the public, just like - for example - RECO informs the public of the trading names of registrants ? This would enable both members of the public, and other registrants, to know whether an agent is working full-time or part-time.
  • Nick Boothby | 25 Sep 2014, 11:10 PM Agree 0
    I'm pretty sure that when applying to renew your RECO registration, you are obliged to show whether you work full-time or part-time in Real Estate.
    Also I believe that, if your full-time or part-time status changes during the next two years before again renewing your RECO registration, then you are obliged to inform RECO immediately, just the same as you are obliged to inform RECO whenever you change your Brokerage affiliation or your home address.
    IF I'm correct about having to inform RECO of your full-time or part-time status, then WHY is this information not made available to the public, just like - for example - RECO informs the public of the trading names of registrants ? This would enable both members of the public, and other registrants, to know whether an agent is working full-time or part-time.
  • Mary | 26 Sep 2014, 08:47 AM Agree 1
    we reserve out time evenings and weekends to accomodate our client's time schedule. During the other times we have to do research, seek more professional counselling, deal with the mortgagers, lawyers, government ofices ( they only work monday to Friday). So much more behind the scenes work to ensure our clients transactions are professionally handled.
  • George | 26 Sep 2014, 09:56 AM Agree 1
    Guys... Most of us in this "forum" work at least 50 hs p/week and I guess clients can see the difference between one part-time agent and a full time agent. Not only during the presentations but also the language we use and the knowledge that we spread on the table. If you have "no clue" about real estate, in most of the cases clients can smell it" (DO you remember the 1st time that you were in a listing presentation or your 1st showing?)
    Having said that, we have to accept the fact that whatever we write in here it's only "therapeutic". Just to release steam between us. Nothing will change because the "guys" who have to make the changes, are the same guys who "collect the money". In the very slim chance that some of them are reading these comments, I guess that they must be laughing AT us. Simply because "they know that WE know". And they know that we know that they won't do anything about it. FYI: About a year ago, I sent a letter to the President of CREA telling him the they do NOT care at all about their member and they were a bunch of lairs and crooks who make what it's better for THEM not for members or the industry. Guess what ?? He didn't have the guts to answer me. So... as you can see, the "NO answer"... IS the answer. So... Lets go back to work (we have several memberships to pay)
  • Ed | 26 Sep 2014, 12:42 PM Agree 1
    If RECO's mandate is to protect consumers, as they claim, then they need to better monitor and educate part-timers. I have seen too many instances where part-times cannot provide proper service due to lack of knowledge and experience. If they don't know the basics (and they DON'T!), then the consumer is not adequately protected. Its that simple.
  • winnipegger | 29 Sep 2014, 10:56 AM Agree 1
    In Manitoba, you are not allowed to work at another occupation or receive remuneration from another employer. Essentially you have to be a full time realtor.
  • justsaying | 01 Oct 2014, 01:25 PM Agree 0
    Would the same be said for a Realtor who owns a business, or several rental properties, would they have to disclose that? What about someone who does a lot of volunteer work???? Where do you draw the line? I know several full time Realtors who don't make time for their clients, who are to busy with their own interests! Really what it comes down to is the client won't return if they haven't been given good service. So the part timer who doesn't do well won't be in the business long. Doing a deal or two a year does not cover what it costs to be a Realtor. Perhaps the full time Realtors that are feeling the pinch need to do more to make more.
  • Kalson | 02 Oct 2014, 01:10 PM Agree 1
    Excellent suggestion, as a win win for both sides - it should be mandatory to declare part time status in all contracts and promotional material so that the consumers now what kind of service they can expect.
  • jimbank | 03 Oct 2014, 09:01 PM Agree 0
    There are many professionals that work part time including doctors, dentists, lawyers etc. Realtors should not compare themselves to some high status job with the limited amount of education required. I have an idea make everyone in the industry presently and in the future should have to take a four year course before they get licensed. You full timers crying the blues about part timers taking away their bread and butter maybe the part timers are giving better service if they are a threat to you. Pull up your socks and get to work and the money will follow rather than pointing fingers.
  • Mike | 05 Oct 2014, 08:03 PM Agree 0
    I've been licensed 13 years and every deal is different and provides a learning experience. Every year it seems that more and more liability is put upon us. The general public questions the reason for full service fees as they are bombarded by info on discount firms. As an industry, how do we defend our fees for service when we have part timers who are not learning through experience representing us to the public? How many of us have completed a purchase and sale agreement for an inept agent or guided them through the process or wrote a counter offer cleaning up their mistakes? New agents have to learn and it takes time but they are committed and focused on getting better while a part timer is giving less than half their energy to learning. They don't have the time to prospect and get business to give them the experience they need and the general public is exposed to them, mistakes are made and they take business away from someone trying to work full time. Which means, the public suffers, our industry image is damaged, our value watered down and some agents who may have turned into great agents down the road are driven out of business because the one or two more sales they may have gotten and helped them survive that year was taken by a part timer further hurting our industry. We are a licensed body of professionals. What are part timers doing in it??
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