Crafting a perfect call to action

by REP26 Nov 2014
Real estate marketing is everywhere – auto-shop waiting rooms, church newsletters and park benches, to name a few – but getting your target audience to actually do something requires more than taking out an ad.
A call to action is essential for directing potential clients to the next steps, whether that’s signing up for a newsletter, inquiring about a free home evaluation, or getting access to the latest market data. But a call to action needs to be specific in order for it to be an effective marketing tool.
Here are four tips for creating the perfect call to action.
1 – Determine what you want
Of course you want new clients – that’s why you advertise, after all. But a successful call to action is specific. Maybe you want to add more names to your newsletter subscriber list, or you want more people to take advantage of your free home inspection program.
A call to action for each of these things will be different, so determining the reason for your interaction with potential clients is crucial.
2 – Get specific
Be blunt in your call to action – say exactly what you want readers to do and, more importantly, why they should do it.
For example: Subscribe to our free monthly newsletter explains what readers should do (“subscribe”) and why they should do it (“to get the free monthly newsletter”).
3 – Keep it simple
Your call to action should be short – only a few words. Any longer than that and you’ll risk readers skimming over the call to action and leaving your webpage or advertisement without offering their contact information.
Focus on your message, and be blunt in your call to action.
4 – Follow up
While following up isn’t really about creating a call to action, it’s still quite important. The reason for a call to action – or any marketing technique, for that matter – is to gain your audience’s contact information, so that you can turn them into a client.
If you don’t follow up after the call to action has been heeded, you may as well scrap your newsletter, your free home valuation program, and anything else you want your readers to do.



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