The Guardian puts Canada on the spotlight

by 06 Jul 2016
Canada has become such an intense topic of discussion, even U.K.-based news giant The Guardian has stood up and taken notice.
 
In its July 4 announcement, the publication said that it will be placing Canada on the spotlight in a “special live week” that would delve into pressing issues such as real estate.
 
“Last week, Barack Obama declared: ‘The world needs more Canada’. We couldn’t agree more,” The Guardian wrote, alluding to the U.S. president’s meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto in the recently concluded North American Leaders’ Summit in Ottawa.
 
The Guardian stated that the complexities beneath Canada’s seemingly placid image merit greater attention.
 
“[A] closer look reveals that Vancouver is buzzing with barely disguised fury against an influx of hot Chinese cash,” the paper said. “Calgary is locked in a struggle against the very thing that made it rich, the car. Montreal is still reeling from the corruption fiasco that was the 1976 Olympics.”
 
“In Toronto the former mayor’s popularity only went up after he admitted that the footage his drug dealer snuck of him smoking crack in the dealer’s basement was not, in fact, fake,” it added.
 
The Guardian will be publishing Canada-centric pieces in its Cities portal (https://www.theguardian.com/cities) from July 4 to July 8, with each day focusing on a different city (having started with Toronto on the 4th).
 
“We’ll also look at some ideas currently resonating across the nation, from multiculturalism to the death of street hockey, and the struggle of First Nations to find their place in Canada’s urban environment.”
 
In addition, The Guardian encouraged Canadian readers to share their thoughts on the featured cities.
 
“No matter where you are or how big or small your community, we want you to share your perspectives with us. What are the best – and worst – things about Canadian city life? How do you feel about Canada’s future? Bust some myths for us, lift the lid, celebrate, criticise, poke fun, praise: it’s over to you.”

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